Posted in body, general education, health, homeschool, special education

Drinking Water is Good for You!

It’s So Hot… But the Water’s Not…

Here, in Connecticut, it seems like we went from winter to 90’s and haven’t looked back since June.

Since our house is a rambling old Tudor, the upstairs gets… well… rather “toasty” in the summer. Those big windows that let all the delicious light in during the winter create a mini-greenhouse in the summer. We broke down and put in the air conditioners this past weekend.

At school, I find myself reminding my teens about proper hydration, especially since there are a few of them that need motor breaks and outdoor time to refocus partway through the day.

Because we have a looser schedule in the summer (reading, writing and math, a social-emotional learning lesson and an extra period for reinforcing behavioral skills), I was looking for some lessons on self-care, and thought about teaching my students about how to keep hydrated when the weather is so hot.

http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
health and hydration
drinking water
Use the summer months to teach students about the importance of proper hydration.

The Importance of Drinking Enough Water

Here are some important facts about water and the human body:

  1. Your body is 50-65% water. Men are more “watery” than women, on average.
  2. The water in your bloodstream is like an HVAC system. It distributes heat evenly, keeping your temperature constant.
  3. Water is part of every chemical reaction in your body. All the enzymes that make you “go” need water in order to work.
  4. You need water for proper sanitation. Without water, well… you just can’t pee and poop properly. And sweat contains salt wastes, as well as helping to cool you when you’re hot.
  5. Water is the most important “nutrient” in you diet. A person can live without food for a long time, but only for 3 days without water.

The rule of thumb is you should drink half of your body weight (lbs) in ounces of water. For example, a 160-lb teen should drink 160/2, or 80 oz of water. That’s a little more than a half gallon of water a day! Fear not, however: eating fresh fruits and vegetables can give you a lot of that water.

If it’s hot outside, if you have a fever, if you don’t feel well, if you’re exercising … then you will need more water. In general, if you aren’t feeling your best, if you’re tired or cranky, start out with a glass of water — it might do the trick!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0590221973/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0590221973&linkCode=as2&tag=allkidscanlea-20&linkId=80fdd0c34cb064b7b2a2fa033857aa94
http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
health and hydration
drinking water
A Drop of Water, by Walter Wick – click for details.

Lessons on Health and Hydration, by Grade Level

I did a quick search of lesson plans on water and nutrition. Here are a few lesson plans that I though looked especially good. Let me know in the comments if you try them or if you find other ones to add to the list:

Early Childhood / Preschool and Kindergarten

Water is Your Best Friend” ~ Dublin San Ramon Services District (Dublin, California)

Let’s Drink Water!” ~ Cavity-Free Kids

Primary Grades / First and Second Grade

Teaching Kids the Importance of Drinking Water” ~ SF Gate

Hydration” ~ Fizzy’s Lunch Lab

Elementary Grades / Third and Fourth Grade

Water and You” ~ Health Teacher

Aqua Bodies: Healthy Hydration” ~ Project WET Foundation

Upper Elementary Grades / Fifth and Sixth Grade

You Are What You Drink!” ~ Teach Engineering

Drinking Water Worksheet Questions” {for research] ~ The Center for Global Studies (Penn State University)

Junior High / Seventh and Eighth Grade

Quench Your Thirst: The Importance of Water” ~ Health Powered Kids

Are You Dehydrated?” ~ The Water Project

High School / Ninth through Twelfth Grade

Drinking Water and Your Health” ~ Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Choosing Healthy Beverages” ~ Eat. Right. Now. (Drexel University)

http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
drinking water
health and hydration
Living things are 50-65% water. {Image credit: (c) 2019, Kim M. Bennett}

Choosing a Hydration Lesson Plan

Pick the lesson plan you use based on the comprehension level of your students, then choose the reading materials based on their reading level. For example, my summer school students are teens, so I would deliver the content using one of the junior high or high school plans. However, since they don’t read at that level right now, I would give them student materials at the elementary or upper elementary levels. (NOTE: you can use ReadWorks to find reading materials if the ones in the lessons are not the right level for your kids).

Do you have favorite lessons or activities that you use to teach your students the importance of drinking enough water? Link them up, below!

Author:

Mom of four, Nana to seven, homeschooler, special educator, and lover of all good things... striving to do His work every day.

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