Posted in general education, homeschool, mind, more seeds, social studies, special education

Technology in the Classroom, 2: Using Sutori to Create Digital Timelines

Timelines in History Class

Timelines are a powerful way to teach historical information, in any content area. Experts on teaching history have identified five ways that the use of timelines helps students master important historical ideas:

  1. Information is presented in a historical context, instead of isolated facts;
  2. Ideas are connected to one another, enabling greater understanding of bigger historical themes and movements;
  3. Students develop the background knowledge necessary for engagement in deeper analysis and discussion;
  4. Students see the sequence and timing of events, understanding how one event contributed to the ones that follow;
  5. Timelines provide a structure for organizing information, making it easier to learn and remember.

Digital Timelines

Many teachers create timelines from strips of paper or sentence strips, adding events to the timelines as they come up during instruction. In this post, we will review how digital timelines can be created and used by teachers and students to teach, learn and respond to historical ideas, by students of all abilities.

There are many free digital timeline apps available. This timeline was created using the free version of Sutori, which creates a number of types of presentations, called “stories.”

Digital timelines have advantages over the paper wall version most of us are familiar with. Most importantly, they invite direct use by students. A wall timeline can be referred to by the teacher, or used as a resource by the students. A digital timeline, however, can be directly manipulated by the learner, via any electronic device. Secondly, because they are digital, a variety of media can be embedded or linked to the timeline, including teacher notes, PowerPoints, images, videos and web pages. This makes the timeline adaptable to the 21st Century tools our students already have access to. Additionally, more literacy-based activities can be connected to their use, as the space used by text is flexible (not fixed, as with a paper timeline). Another advantage of the digital timeline format is the ability to share electronically with other collaborators, with the teacher, and anyone else with a link. This allows multiple contributors, a cycle of review and revision, and other high-quality publishing activities to take place.

Most timeline apps have a wide variety of ready-made templates to choose from. I found the template I used in Sutori to be very helpful in designing a high-quality, rich timeline with a variety of interactive elements — ones I might not have considered, had it not been for the template’s suggestion.

A Walk-through of a Sutori Timeline: The Early History of Norwich, Connecticut

Working with digital timelines gives students excellent opportunities to practice important literacy skills:

  1. Selection of a feature image: Students practice how to choose a cover image that adds to the story of their timeline.
  2. Creation of a title: Students practice creating a title that captures the main idea of their story.
  3. Development of an introductory paragraph: Students practice important summary skills.
  4. Use of embedded tools: Students use embedded presentation and collaboration tools.
5
  • 5. Image selection: Students must research to find time-appropriate images that add value to the text, for timeline events.
  • 6. Labeling of timeline entries: Students practice writing timeline labels that capture important historical events.
  • 7. Evaluation and selection of appropriate sources, with proper links to all resources: link to high-quality source is provided, for further information.
  • 8. Giving and receiving appropriate feedback, through comments link.
  • 9. Writing informational text: Students create concise explanatory text to accompany images and explain relevance of timeline events.
  • 10. Creation of Subheadings: Brief subtitles (with dates) that help the viewer navigate the presentation, and that are appropriate for the timeline section.
  • 11. Use of sidebars: Use of embedded “Did You Know?” module allows student to include fun facts, explanations of terms and other interesting information.
  • 12. Connection to known landmarks: Use of images and information about commonly known, local landmarks helps viewer connect with the presentation, and helps establish connection between big historical events and local history.
  • 13. Identification of necessary background knowledge: The embedded Video module allows the student to include videos of any length, to help the viewer understand the content better.
  • 14, 15. Use of interactive elements: The students can engage the viewers by including interactive elements, such as the Quiz module, which can provides feedback to the responder.
  • 16. Connection to famous locals: Including famous people from the area helps viewers see connection between “big” history and their own region.
  • 17. Use of embedded digital media: Students can embed Google Docs, Canva infographics (such as the one shown), Flickr albums and a wide variety of other media, using the embedded tools. This allows showcasing of other student work in the timeline, allows students to customize their timeline and adds viewer interest.
  • 18. Development of discussion questions: By using the Forum module, students can identify and include compelling questions that lead to classroom discussions.
  • 19. Selection of graphic aids: Students can include a variety of graphic aids, including paintings, portraits, photographs, drawings, maps, and charts, as the content dictates. Here, the map of the trolley line includes local street names, so students can see where trolleys once ran in their hometown.
  • 20. Making connections across time periods: By including connections to today in their concluding paragraphs, they show the relationship between past events and the way history unfolded up to the present day.
  • 21. Proper citation of digital sources: The bibliography modules in the template allow for students to include properly cited digital resources used in their stories.
  • 22. Use of hyperlinks: Students practice correctly hyperlinking their sources to the correct webpage.
  • 23. Sharing of tools and techniques: As a consultant, I was always taught to debrief not only the content I presented, but the strategies and tools I used, as well. Giving students the opportunity to share the tools they used with others fosters a spirit of collaboration.

If you’d like to see the whole presentation, feel free to click over to The Early History of Norwich, Connecticut , on Sutori.

Options for Using Digital Timelines

By Students…

Student products. We have gone over in detail how digital timelines are an excellent way for students to “show what they know.” Consider using them as a replacement for essays, reports and other research projects.

By Teachers…

Stand-alone presentations: Teachers can develop stand-alone lessons using the timeline (don’t forget – Sutori has other “story” options, as well!). In presentation mode, each element is displayed, one at a time, making the timeline more like a PowerPoint presentation.

Organization of units of study: The timeline can be used as an outline for a unit of study, with each element representing a lesson within the study. Lesson material (Google Docs, videos, PowerPoints, etc.) can be linked via the embedded linking tools. The subheadings are available on the sidebar to the left, for easy navigation between components.

Try Making a Timeline!

I have always used PowerPoint to organize my lessons in science and social studies. After playing around with Sutori, I can’t wait to start using it for my lessons, instead! I’d love to hear how you have used digital timelines with students. Share!

Posted in mind, social studies

Using Circle Maps in History Class

Teaching Big Ideas to a Class with Diverse Learning Needs

General educators and special educators, alike, daily face a dilemma: how do I teach high-quality, grade-level content ideas when my students have such varied learning needs and abilities?

So often, students who struggle are given a watered down version of the content, rather than the same content, taught in a different way. Similarly, students who excel are often given the same content, but given less support in learning it, as the only “enrichment.”

Using thinking maps enables a classroom teacher to deliver grade-level content, involving higher-order thinking, in a format that is understandable and accessible to the greatest number of students in the classroom.

Thinking maps are visual representations of higher-order thinking skills: defining in context, classifying, describing, comparing, sequencing, showing cause and effect, illustrating analogies and demonstrating part-to-whole and whole-to-part relationships. By using a distinct visual representation for each skill, and limiting the types of graphic representations used, students can master not only the use of the organizer, but the represented skill, as well.

Thinking Maps (Hyerle and Yeager, 2007) are distinct graphic representations of eight major higher-order thinking skills.

What is a Circle Map?

In 2007, Hyerle and Yeager described eight visual tools that could be used to show important relationships in any subject area. A circle map is one of these major thinking maps. It is used to define big ideas, such as the Industrial Revolution, institutionalized racism, or the Fourth Amendment, in context.

The basic structure of a circle map.

In the example, below, a Circle Map is used to define the concept of “storm.” The first circle contains the concept word, which is surrounded by another circle with vocabulary words used to define what a storm is. On the outside, are examples of the concept, from literature and the students’ experiences.

A primary grade example of the use of the Circle Map, to define the concept of “storm.”

I first saw a Circle Map used with adult learners in a session about cultural awareness. The concept being defined in context was the Declaration of Independence. The question being asked was, “Who did the Founding Fathers refer to when they stated, ‘All men are created equal?'”

In the center was the term, Declaration of Independence. The first circle contained a brainstorm description of the types of individuals who were the writers of the document: white men, men of European descent, English citizens, landowners, many of them lawyers, rich by that day’s standards, learned, Christian, The outside area listed other groups of people present at the time of the writing: indigenous peoples, poor, indentured servants, African slaves, people who didn’t own land, citizens from other countries (France, Germany), women, non-Christians, uneducated.

After the creation of this map, the participants discussed the question, “Who did the Founding Fathers refer to when they stated, ‘All men are created equal?'” They used the Circle Map and the difficulties faced by the groups on the outside, then and today, as discussion points.

Using a Circle Map in Connecticut History: The Millionaires of Norwich

I recently developed a series of lesson tools on the Millionaires’ Triangle, an area of Norwich, Connecticut that once served as the seat of Connecticut government (during the Civil War), and which was settled by some of the richest, most influential people in New England, during the early days of the colonies and the country.

As I read about the prosperity and philanthropy of these individuals, whose wealth rivaled that of the Rockefellers in history, I wondered to myself how far the influence of these individuals actually stretched. I used a circle map to show their reach.

I created a Circle Map in Canva, which ended up as an infographic. Although at first glance it looks more like a Bubble Map, the information is actually in concentric circles, and only surrounded by “bubbles” as a visual aid for the graphic.

An embellished Circle Map, showing graphically the influence of the millionaire founders of the city of Norwich, Connecticut. {Image credit: (c) 2019, Kim M. Bennett}

The concept to be defined, in context, is the influence of the millionaires in the Millionaires’ Triangle of Norwich (center, black circle). Using historical documents and online research, I gathered information about the businesses and government involvement of these founding fathers and mothers of Norwich, and the charitable foundations they established during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Surrounding the concept circle, I broke the information into two concentric circles, instead of a single one. The inner circle represents the major industries where the Millionaires had direct influence, through ownership or through major financing of the venture (white circles). The next layer represented the detail of the various groups of people directly affected by the ventures of the Millionaires, through their companies, their foundations and other philanthropic dealings (green circles).

In the area outside the circles, I wanted to list those groups who were explicitly absent from the influence of the Millionaires, or whose livelihood was in direct conflict with the activities of these individuals. The fact that the entire area now covered by the city of Norwich was once Mohegan Burial Ground, makes the Mohegans an important addition to the outside region of the map.

Circle Maps are not meant to be static. I could easily add “non-servant immigrants” to the outside area. If the only immigrants helped by the ventures were ones employed by the Millionaires, that would be an important fact to add. The Narragansetts were also in the region, and had a very different relationship with English settlers – they could be added to the outside area, as well. The point of a Circle Map is to give the student a better understanding of the key concept, by providing background information that helps define it for that situation, and to be used as a starting point for conversation.

A Circle Map can then be used to generate questions:

  • What about immigrants who weren’t employees? Where were they?
  • What happened to the Mohegan residents of the area that is now Norwich?
  • Is the area still influenced by the early founders? In what ways?
  • Did Uncas make the right choice for the Mohegans to work with the settlers?
  • Did the Narragansetts fair better, by opposing the settlers?
  • What happened to the foundations and businesses of the Millionaires? What still exists, today?

Using Circle Maps in Your Classroom

I would love to hear from you to see how you’ve used Circle Maps with your students. In the comments, write a link to your photo or post, let us know the grade, subject and important concept being defined. Thanks!

Posted in general education, homeschool, mind, social studies, special education

Technology in the History Class: Creating a Facebook Travelogue

The Language Demands of Social Studies Learning

Social studies classes can be challenging for many students. Often, the content is text-based, which is daunting for students who struggle with grade-level reading. Response work is usually written, and, quite frequently, takes the form of research projects or essays – an added hurdle for many students. In addition, the topics are often from the distant past, and students have difficulty connecting them to their present life.

Students who are challenged by literacy-based learning tasks can still be actively engaged in high-quality, grade-level learning tasks, if we do two things:

  1. Make the task more accessible (by controlling the language demands); and
  2. Increase the interest level (by making the content and format more relevant to the students).
social media in history class
http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
Facebook photo albums can be a way for students to share their history learning with others.

Facebook Photo Albums as Response Work

In a world where kids have more technology in their pockets than most teachers do in their classroom, it seems silly to ignore how adept today’s kids are in the electronic world. While many of their teachers are “digital immigrants,” they are, indeed, “digital natives,” many learning to “swipe left” before they even reach school age.

While we want to encourage kids to be well-balanced in their use of their electronic devices, it pays to think about the world they live in when we design response projects. True example: I have three boys, ages 32, 29, and 15. That’s right – there are 14 years between the last two boys, who both had the same 3rd grade teacher. I was disappointed to see that, 14 years after my middle child was in 3rd grade, the teachers were still using the same projects, the same books and the same strategies as they had with #2 son.

Enter social media. Now, I know that 1) my kids use social media platforms that I know little about and 2) they insist that Facebook is for “old people” now. But they all are familiar with Facebook, and it’s been around long enough to have a well-developed suite of tools that can be used in many ways in the classroom.

I do a lot of family history and geneology work. Whenever I can, I find authentic photos of people, places and events to add to my Ancestry.com work, and share them with my family by creating photo albums on Facebook. It occurred to me that Facebook photo albums would make a great vehicle for students to share their learning:

  • capturing part of the message in an illustration provides scaffolding for students who struggle with print media;
  • creating a caption allows for students to practice summarizing;
  • use of Internet content gives students an opportunity to learn how to give credit to other people’s work;
  • albums can be shared among different people as a group project.
social media in the history class
http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
Instruct students to find photos of historical individuals, places and events, to tell important social studies information.

The Millionaires’ Triangle, Norwich, Connecticut

Recently, I created a walking tour of Norwich, Connecticut, that circles the Chelsea Parade Park and passes by Norwich Free Academy. Using online photos and content, I created a Facebook photo album that can serve as a virtual travelogue for the Millionaires’ Triangle Trail.

Each photo album entry contains the following:

  1. The stop number, with an image of a stop along the trail (I used Internet photos, but you could take your own photos, if you wish);
  2. A description of the photo, which includes the stop number, the name of the famous person who lived there, the year the house was built and the architectural style, and the address of the site or home (since it’s a walking tour);
  3. A brief summary of the life of the family who lived there, including the source of their fortune;
  4. A tag identifying the location;
  5. When needed, an image credit (many of the photos are part of the historical record of the town).

The stops are in order, so that the album can actually be used to conduct a walking tour.

social media in the history class
http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
Historical maps and other figures, properly cited, can be helpful additions to a Facebook photo album in the history class.

Tips for Integrating Social Media in the Classroom

Using Facebook in school isn’t like using it at home:

  • consult with your administrator first, before setting up a page;
  • create a class or school Facebook page – don’t use your own account or a student account;
  • use photos of historical people, places and things, only – don’t include photos of the children;
  • consider setting your account so that comments are not allowed;
  • make your page by invite only, and set the privacy so that only current families (not the students) have access — remove access once families are no longer part of your classroom.

When you set students out to find images for the photo album, provide guidelines to help them choose well:

  1. What important information does this image tell the reader about ______?
  2. Is this the BEST image to give that message?
  3. What information do I have to include in the caption, so my image stands alone?
  4. What order do we have to put the images in, to tell the story properly?
social media in the history class
http;//allkidscanlearn.school.blog
Give students guidelines and practice Internet safety when using social media in the classsroom.

Social Media in YOUR Classroom…

How have you used social media in the classroom? Share the best of the best with us, in the comments below – add a link so we can visit and comment!


{ This blog is featured in Top 100 Special Education Blogs}

Posted in general education, homeschool, more seeds, reflection, special education

35 Things I Learned in 35 Years of Teaching

A Little About Me…

Yes, that’s right.

I’ve been an educator for 35 years. Over the course of my career I’ve had the following teaching assignments (in order):

reflection
http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
Working in the school garden as a STEM Coach. {Image Credit: (c) 2014, Kim M. Bennett}

Agricultural Educator

  • Intern at the Northeast Career Center and the Ohio School for the Deaf, and area elementary schools in Columbus, Ohio, as an agricultural educator;
  • Graduate Teaching Assistant, teaching non-majors introductory horticulture and plant identification classes at The Ohio State University;
  • Adjunct Instructor, teaching vocational agriculture to non-degree students at the Ratcliffe School of Agriculture at the University of Connecticut;
  • Trainer and Instructor, teaching Home Depot garden center employees introductory horticulture in the Northeastern United States.
reflections 
http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
My first Clinical Day Treatment School classroom. {Image Credit: (c) 2018, Kim M. Bennett}

Early Childhood Educator

  • Preschool teacher, working with 3- and 4-year-olds at the Willington Nursery Cooperative in Willington, Connecticut;
  • 1:1 Educational Assistant, working with a student with multiple disabilities at Center Elementary School in Willington, Connecticut;
  • Special Education Paraprofessional, working with 1st through 3rd grade students with mild to moderate disabilities at Center Elementary School;
  • Kindergarten Paraprofessional, Center Elementary School;
  • Dual Language Teacher, working with 3rd grade students in the Companeros Program at North Windham Elementary School in Willimantic, Connecticut.

Educational Consultant

  • Education Consultant and Team Coordinator, Early Intervention and Teaching and Learning Projects, State Education Resource Center, Middletown, Connecticut;
  • Independent Education Consultant, working with educators nationwide, at Northside Consulting.
reflection
http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
A presentation on vocabulary centers for 6th grade teachers. {Image Credit: (c) 2012, Kim M. Bennett (A Child’s Garden)}

Homeschooler

  • Homeschool teacher/assistant principal/chief cook and bottle washer, Grades 1-10… on to 11th grade next year…

STEM Coach and Consultant

  • STEM Consultant, New London Public Schools, working with grades K-12;
  • STEM Coach, Winthrop STEM Elementary Magnet School, New London, Connecticut, working with educators and students in grades K-5.
reflection
http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
My current Clinical Day Treatment School classroom. {Image Credit: (c) 2018, Kim M. Bennett}

Special Educator

  • Special Ed intern at York Correctional Institution and Carl Robinson Correctional Institution, working with adults with disabilities in all content areas;
  • Literacy tutor at CRCI, working with adults with reading disabilities;
  • Special Educator, working at Natchaug Hospital, with students grades 6-12 in an alternative, clinical day treatment setting for students with emotional, mental health and addiction issues.

It’s taken me a long time, but I know the place where I currently roost is where I’m supposed to be. It’s my favorite position of all my time as an educator.

Saturday homeschool… because the teacher was out sick without a sub for three days. {Image Credit: (c) 2014, Kim M. Bennett}

What I’ve Learned About Teaching

Here are 35 things I learned over 35 years of being an educator – in no particular order.

  1. If you want the pruners put back in the right place, trace their outline onto the pegboard with a Sharpie. Label the outline, “pruners.”
  2. Parents do the best they can with what they have.
  3. Some teachers get a “loaded” classroom, because those kids deserve the best instruction.
  4. It’s really okay to say that you don’t want to teach anymore.
  5. Teachers don’t like having new curriculum materials every two years. It makes them feel like new teachers all over again.
  6. All of us (kids and adults) learn new ideas better when we start with concrete objects.
  7. Incarcerated adults love succeeding at school.
  8. Some kids swear and act out because that’s the only power they feel like they have.
  9. Loving your students is a bittersweet part of the job.
  10. Being a second-language learner means you know one more language than most Americans – and that’s a strength.
  11. Rubrics are great for teaching, learning and assessment.
  12. Kids with behavior problems aren’t used to hearing about their strengths.
  13. People who are white can never really understand what it’s like to be a student of color in America.
  14. Teaching teachers is harder than teaching students of any age.
  15. When looking at data, there’s always a story behind the numbers.
  16. “Homeschool” isn’t “school at home.”
  17. Many kids learn just fine when they’re “unschooled.”
  18. Kids become attached to their teacher.
  19. New teachers sometimes need a shoulder to cry on, a reminder to eat, and chocolate.
  20. Teacher’s guides are not meant to be followed cover to cover.
  21. Little kids can understand big numbers – and we should let littles work with them.
  22. Elementary and Special Ed teachers need more confidence in science and math.
  23. Social studies = the forgotten subject in elementary schools.
  24. Finding a restaurant in the phone book is not an easy task for many students with disabilities.
  25. Teens find it more fun to swear in English than in their first language (whether Spanish, Creole or American Sign Language).
  26. It’s easier to remember scientific names if you set them to music.
  27. Preschoolers and college students both need to be reminded to eat right and go to bed on time.
  28. Stations and centers are fun for littles, teens and even adult learners (even though no one likes to call them “centers” with big kids).
  29. All kids can learn to love going to the library.
  30. Play is work for little kids.
  31. A good record-keeping system makes a SpEd teacher’s life much happier.
  32. For most kids, reading and writing happens spontaneously, when provided the right environment.
  33. Teachers are historically underpaid for what they do in the United States.
  34.  Gifted and talented kids need specialized instruction, too.
  35. Children will rise to meet the bar, however high (or low) you set it.

How About You?

What are some take-aways you’ve had, as an educator? Please share.

Posted in general education, homeschool, mind, more seeds, social studies, special education

#RealAmericans: A Photo Journal

“Real Americans” in the News

There has been a lot of talk in the news, on social media, and on the radio, about some of the comments made by prominent citizens in our country, on the subject of what it looks like to be a “real American.”

As most of us did, regardless of our own political and religious views, I reacted strongly to some of the messaging that I heard and saw.

A very wise friend of mine once told me, “If something upsets you, don’t do anything. Sleep on it. If you are still upset the next day, THEN do something about it.”

The next day, I was still aching, deep in my heart. But, being a teacher, I have learned that there is ALWAYS something to be learned, no matter how tragic, painful or even benign, the situation. So I set about trying to figure out what it was that I (ME!) needed to learn about what it was to be a REAL American.

The #RealAmericans Project

I created my own challenge, entitled #RealAmericans, and created a Facebook album to share as I learned (a Pinterest page will follow… stay tuned). I didn’t want it to be politically or religiously biased in any way, so I had to think hard about what messages I wanted it so give. Here are the messages I hope people hear/see from this project.

  1. Diversity is a strength. I want the project to include Americans of all kinds, of all races, of all walks of life.
  2. Love wins. No matter what the image, I wanted it to project a message of love. People might not agree with a political viewpoint, but they can’t disagree with love.
  3. Real Americans spend their lives doing wonderful, ordinary, ground-breaking things. Diapering a toddler is as important as owning a company; tending an orphaned duck is as important as leading a protest. Running a classroom is as important as running a bank or running a marathon.
  4. Everyone is my neighbor. Yes, even the ones I disagree with. Maybe even don’t like that well.
  5. There is always a story behind the image. Images we see in the news are real people. With real, American stories.
  6. Americans share common values. I want to include at least three photos from each of the 50 states and the protectorates of our country. At least one photo should show racial diversity. One photo shares a love theme.
#RealAmericans
#DiversityisStrength
http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
The #RealAmericans Project ~ where #DiversityisStrength.

Your Own #RealAmericans Project

If controversy arises in your classroom over what kids see in the news, instead of persuading them, challenge them to do their own #RealAmericans Project. Make sure that they include the story of the individual in the caption.

  • the person’s name
  • a brief description of the person’s role(s)
  • a statement about the person’s life.
  • the location of the photo
  • proper image credit

If you choose to do your own #RealAmericans Project, please link up the post or album in the comments section, below. Feel free to use the hashtags #RealAmericans and #DiversityisStrength. I would ask that you keep to the messages that I listed above, and keep the message positive and loving.

Namaste.

Posted in arts, more seeds, special education, spirit

Using Music in the Classroom

Music – it’s Not Just for Music Teachers!

I’ve been a teacher for a long time. Music has always been a tool that I’ve used in my classroom, from pre-K through adult education.

I don’t want you to think I’m that magical teacher who started every day playing the piano or guitar and singing with my students. I HAVE done that before, but not everyone can play an instrument or sing. That doesn’t mean that you can’t use music to reach the students in your room.

Today, I wanted to share with you some tips for incorporating music into your daily or weekly routines, and some of the brain research into why you should especially consider it, if you’re working with students who have disabilities.

Why Music?

We all can relate to the effects that some music has on us, as people. But is there actual research on the effects of music on us? If so, what does it say? How can we use that in our teaching?

As it turns out, there is a LOT of research on the positive effects of music on humans (and other species), of all ages. Dr. Jeremy Dean, psychologist from University College in London, has compiled research studies on a number of ways that music improves our lives as humans:

  1. It improves our cognitive ability (especially if we learn to play an instrument);
  2. It gives us a feeling of tapping into something bigger than ourselves;
  3. It makes us feel happier;
  4. It makes us feel closer to others (especially when we perform together)
  5. It decreases our stress levels and increases heart health;
  6. It helps us manage our moods;
  7. It changes the way we see other people;
  8. It makes the world seem more colorful;
  9. It improves our vision (really!);
  10. It’s something we are drawn too from birth.

Simple Ways to Incorporate Music into Your Daily Routines

As I said, music sneaks into my day regularly. Here are some ways to use it easily, organized by goal areas (I included BONUS homework activities – my students are notorious for not doing homework, but these ideas have worked for me year after year).

“Sheet Music” by nick.amoscato is licensed under CC BY 2.0 

Academic/Cognitive ~ Language Arts

  • Song Lyrics as Poetry: My students often balk if I mention that we are going to do a poetry unit. When that happens, I use song lyrics to lead off the unit. Starting with familiar songs hooks the students, enabling me to then shift into classic pieces during the unit. {BONUS: My kids don’t like to do homework. But they WILL write down the lyrics to their favorite songs, especially if we are going to use them in class that week}
  • Mood and Theme in Literature: Last year, my class struggled with comprehension beyond the “right in your face” type. So I wrote common themes in literature on the Promethean board, then played familiar songs for the students, and asked them to identify the theme of the piece (this also works for mood). We discussed how the words and music each contributed to the meaning, much the way you would discuss the words and pictures in a picture book. {BONUS: I gave the kids homework assignments to come to school the next day with a song that fit a particular theme or mood}.

Academic/Cognitive ~ Math

  • Fractions: With students who have an ear for music, and maybe know how to play an instrument or read music, I’ve used note values to help them understand the fractions whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth, and even thirty-second. Here is an online guitar lesson that has audio clips of the various note values.

Study Skills

  • Transitioning into the School Day: One year, I had a very rowdy group, which, ironically, also included a child with agorophobia for whom just entering the classroom was difficult, especially when it was noisy. The way the class came into the building set the (unfortunate) tone for the rest of the morning. Out of desperation, I started playing smooth jazz on my Promethean board, using my Pandora account. The kids entered the building, and said, “Ooh. What’s that?” They entered the room head-bobbing and snapping their fingers – very silly – but 1) got into the room and 2) sat down to work.
  • Focus Aids: Over the years, my kids have asked for music to help them focus when they write, or when they are doing independent work. NOTE: I stick to music without lyrics, as the lyrics are often a distraction. My kids usually ask for piano music.
“SH530048” by fo.ol is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 

Behavioral / Social-Emotional

  • Self-calming #1 ~ Music Contracts: In a previous school, we issued music contracts to students who requested music as a calming or focus aid. Students had to show that they were able to use the aid responsibly (e.g., work got done, the equipment was used and cared for properly, students turned off the devices when asked). We purchased inexpensive MP3 players (without wi-fi or internet capabilities) for each student, and ear buds. We then asked the students to list music they wanted to have on the MP3 player, and one of the staff members found “clean” and school appropriate versions of the songs, and loaded each students MP3 player. {BONUS: the music list can be sent home for homework}
  • Self-calming #2 ~ Mood Reset: In a behavioral health setting, disruptive behavior happens. And it affects the rest of the group, because “everybody’s here for a reason.” One year, when I had quite a few “internalizers,” if there was too much tension, the students would ask to turn off the lights, put their heads down, and listen to music for 5-10 minutes, to get themselves back in order. It was good for all of us.
  • Motor Break: Once in awhile, you get that kid that has to move periodically, to get the sillies or fidgets out. One of my students was given the strategy to go to the back of the room and “dance it out.” He was an excellent dancer, and would do a quick 30-second “Fortnite” dance to get himself refocused (dancing to music inside his head). We got so used to it, and he used it so appropriately, that no one paid him any mind.

Communication

  • Listening: When you work with students with behavioral health or cognitive issues, many will have IEP goals about following directions. Kids with ODD (Oppositional Defiant Disorder) will hear your voice and automatically want to do the opposite, no matter what you’re saying. So, I’ve “tricked” kids into learning how to listen and follow directions by using music as a hook, by having them listen for a particular thing (a word the singer uses to describe his love, the instrument that sets the tone of the piece, the way the writer uses dynamics to surprise you…), then write it down.
“Piano keys” by waltfur is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 

Fine and Gross Motor

  • Coordination and Strength: Kids on certain medications (especially psychotropic ones) have difficulties with their weight, overall energy levels, and, sometimes, coordination. Some kids’ disabilities, themselves, affect their muscle tone. All of these things make physical activity unpleasant for a lot of kids – especially teens, who might not be physical activity fans, anyway. In the past, we’ve had success engaging every one of our kids when we had a drum circle. It’s communal, it’s loud, and they get to bang on stuff – with permission! It also helps them with listening and timing.

Transition

  • Playing Music as a Pastime: When we were cleaning out an old room to turn it into a classroom, we found several keyboards. No one wanted them in their rooms, so my assistant and I took two of them. We set them up near one of the Promethean boards, and found videos on keyboard playing for beginners. Two of my students as to play the keyboards during activity period, every day. Identifying a hobby is an important part of transitioning into adulthood {NOTE: we hide the power cords when we don’t want the keyboards to be a distraction!} .
  • Identifying Strengths: As part of our community meetings, our principal used to set up karaoke, and have open mic times. One year, a new student stepped to the mic and sang the popular song, “Location.” He sounded just like the actual singer! He didn’t realize that he sang as well as he did. Another student would play her ukelele and sing. It was good for the kids to realize they had strengths, and good for their peers to see them in a different light.

Other Ways to Use Music

I know that I focused more on older students in this article. In my experience, it is way easier to get younger students involved in music activities. It’s when students hit the teen years that they become self-conscious and withdrawn. I love to sing and play music, but, as I said, I am NOT the teacher who is drawn to performing in the classroom. The above activities were comfortable for ME, too.

Do you use music in your special education classroom? Let me know in the comments section.

Meet My Musical Family

A little about me and my family:

There are a lot of musicians in my family. Basically, we are our own band:

My husband is a professional drummer… my eldest son plays the clarinet and saxophone… my middle and youngest sons play the trombone… my youngest son also plays the drums… I sing, and play guitar and violin. My mom passed on her musical genes to me. My husband has professional musicians (a bassist, a saxophone player, singers) in his family, and inherited his musical abilities from his mom, too.

So this article touched my soul… I wanted to share some photos of my family, making music. Enjoy!

Posted in body, general education, health, homeschool, special education

Drinking Water is Good for You!

It’s So Hot… But the Water’s Not…

Here, in Connecticut, it seems like we went from winter to 90’s and haven’t looked back since June.

Since our house is a rambling old Tudor, the upstairs gets… well… rather “toasty” in the summer. Those big windows that let all the delicious light in during the winter create a mini-greenhouse in the summer. We broke down and put in the air conditioners this past weekend.

At school, I find myself reminding my teens about proper hydration, especially since there are a few of them that need motor breaks and outdoor time to refocus partway through the day.

Because we have a looser schedule in the summer (reading, writing and math, a social-emotional learning lesson and an extra period for reinforcing behavioral skills), I was looking for some lessons on self-care, and thought about teaching my students about how to keep hydrated when the weather is so hot.

http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
health and hydration
drinking water
Use the summer months to teach students about the importance of proper hydration.

The Importance of Drinking Enough Water

Here are some important facts about water and the human body:

  1. Your body is 50-65% water. Men are more “watery” than women, on average.
  2. The water in your bloodstream is like an HVAC system. It distributes heat evenly, keeping your temperature constant.
  3. Water is part of every chemical reaction in your body. All the enzymes that make you “go” need water in order to work.
  4. You need water for proper sanitation. Without water, well… you just can’t pee and poop properly. And sweat contains salt wastes, as well as helping to cool you when you’re hot.
  5. Water is the most important “nutrient” in you diet. A person can live without food for a long time, but only for 3 days without water.

The rule of thumb is you should drink half of your body weight (lbs) in ounces of water. For example, a 160-lb teen should drink 160/2, or 80 oz of water. That’s a little more than a half gallon of water a day! Fear not, however: eating fresh fruits and vegetables can give you a lot of that water.

If it’s hot outside, if you have a fever, if you don’t feel well, if you’re exercising … then you will need more water. In general, if you aren’t feeling your best, if you’re tired or cranky, start out with a glass of water — it might do the trick!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0590221973/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0590221973&linkCode=as2&tag=allkidscanlea-20&linkId=80fdd0c34cb064b7b2a2fa033857aa94
http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
health and hydration
drinking water
A Drop of Water, by Walter Wick – click for details.

Lessons on Health and Hydration, by Grade Level

I did a quick search of lesson plans on water and nutrition. Here are a few lesson plans that I though looked especially good. Let me know in the comments if you try them or if you find other ones to add to the list:

Early Childhood / Preschool and Kindergarten

Water is Your Best Friend” ~ Dublin San Ramon Services District (Dublin, California)

Let’s Drink Water!” ~ Cavity-Free Kids

Primary Grades / First and Second Grade

Teaching Kids the Importance of Drinking Water” ~ SF Gate

Hydration” ~ Fizzy’s Lunch Lab

Elementary Grades / Third and Fourth Grade

Water and You” ~ Health Teacher

Aqua Bodies: Healthy Hydration” ~ Project WET Foundation

Upper Elementary Grades / Fifth and Sixth Grade

You Are What You Drink!” ~ Teach Engineering

Drinking Water Worksheet Questions” {for research] ~ The Center for Global Studies (Penn State University)

Junior High / Seventh and Eighth Grade

Quench Your Thirst: The Importance of Water” ~ Health Powered Kids

Are You Dehydrated?” ~ The Water Project

High School / Ninth through Twelfth Grade

Drinking Water and Your Health” ~ Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Choosing Healthy Beverages” ~ Eat. Right. Now. (Drexel University)

http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
drinking water
health and hydration
Living things are 50-65% water. {Image credit: (c) 2019, Kim M. Bennett}

Choosing a Hydration Lesson Plan

Pick the lesson plan you use based on the comprehension level of your students, then choose the reading materials based on their reading level. For example, my summer school students are teens, so I would deliver the content using one of the junior high or high school plans. However, since they don’t read at that level right now, I would give them student materials at the elementary or upper elementary levels. (NOTE: you can use ReadWorks to find reading materials if the ones in the lessons are not the right level for your kids).

Do you have favorite lessons or activities that you use to teach your students the importance of drinking enough water? Link them up, below!

Posted in general education, homeschool, literacy, mind, more seeds, special education

Writing for Life: 10 Things Kids Should Be Able to Write

The State of Writing in School

A few years back, fellow homeschool blogger, Mary Prather, wrote about the benefits of giving (or allowing) our children to have an anchor, an activity that they go to to center themselves, to fill time, to find peace, to find challenge. This is a practice I have tried to continue into my own homeschool, and my special ed classroom, as well.

My youngest child is an avid writer. And when I mean writer, I don’t mean he cranks out stories (although he does write stories). I mean, he writes everything: steps to designing a chicken coop in Minecraft; graphic novels about Batman and Star Wars characters; “chapter books” about famous battles; bios of superheroes he invents. In recent years, he has taken on computer coding as a more symbolic way of making meaning. Unlike what happens in most public school classrooms, where kids only write fictional narratives until grade 3 (because it’s on the state test), then they switch to biography (because that’s on the grade 4 test), then on to persuasive essays (you get the picture), my son learned, from an early age, that writing was putting pen (or crayon, or marker, or paintbrush, or keystroke, or all of the above) to paper or screen to communicate. And he simply loves to write in every way that you can.

I don’t have any trouble getting him to write. In fact, early on in our homeschooling of him, we learned to just leave him alone, and be resource providers. We got more mileage out of introducing him to a new genre of writing, and analyzing its features, than by forced writing lessons. But I know that many homeschoolers (and public school teachers!) struggle to get kids to write, and I really believe it’s because we 1) limit what “writing” is… 2) don’t give kids interesting things to write about (or read about, or talk about, for that matter) in most schools… and 3) don’t have a clear purpose for communicating beyond, “It’s our quarterly prompt.”

Real-World Writing Tasks

Here is my list of ten things that I believe all kids (from preschool to high school) should know how to write, in order to be complete writers, and my rationale for each:

  • An organized list
  • An email
  • A business letter
  • A hand-written thank you note
  • A poem or lyrics to a song
  • A personal or fictional narrative
  • A written argument
  • An informational article
  • A photo caption
  • The directions for a task or activity
10 Different Writing Ideas
Incorporating a variety of writing pieces into your writing curriculum engages young writers and teaches them important skills for their adult lives. (c) Kim M. Bennett, 2012.

1. An Organized List…

A list is probably the last thing people think of when they think of writing, and it’s the kind of writing I do most, and do absolutely every day. Creating and using lists teaches kids so many things:

  • Goal-setting & progress monitoring
  • Accountability
  • Prioritization
  • Time allocation

From an early age, my son learned to use a checklist to keep track of his homeschool work and chores. He feels accomplished crossing things off, tends to get less sidetracked by less important distractions, and gets more done, as a result.

In my classroom, I use “100 Lists” as a regular writing task (“List 100 things you love” ~ “List 100 things to do when you’re feeling blue”). This very accessible writing can be used in any subject area, with any student, even ones who have a hard time starting.

2. An Email…

Nowadays, most companies prefer that you contact them by email, and even public school teachers use email to communicate with their students. Judging from the amount of time companies spend on teaching their employees email “etiquette,” it seems that, as a writing form, it deserves its own instruction:

  • Knowing your audience
  • Writing subject lines that enable you to search your mail better
  • Keeping things focused on one topic
  • Responsible use of copy, blind copy, reply all, forward, recall and other functions
  • Attaching or embedding additional information

3. A Business Letter…

Edward Bulwer-Lytton (1839) wrote that “the pen is mightier than the sword.” In these days of email, cell phones and Twitter, customers often neglect the most powerful tool they have to communicate with businesses: the letter.

When kids learn how to write a business letter, they learn some important nuances of language:

  • How to use a formal tone in writing
  • Putting the most important points first (in case the whole letter isn’t read)
  • How to use the “compliment sandwich:” open nicely, get to your issue, then wrap up warmly

Look for opportunities for your kids to practice writing to a company or organization, in homeschool or classroom.

4A Thank You Note…

When I was little, of course we didn’t have computers or cell phones. My mom made us write thank you notes when we received gifts. They didn’t have to be works of art, but they WERE written. The end. Here were her reasons (and they are mine, too!):

  • Manners, manners, manners!
  • Everyone loves to get real mail (don’t you?), written by someone, and addressed to someone by hand. On paper. With a stamp.
  • Gratitude is something we all need to practice.

In short, thank you notes are mostly about the feelings of the other person, and have very little to do with us.

In my third grade classroom, I had a letter writing center, where students practiced letter format and wrote letters to students and staff in the building. Once a day, the “mail carrier” (one of the class jobs for the students) would deliver the mail, putting letters into classroom “mailboxes” (folders tacked to the bulletin board), and hand delivering mail that went outside the classroom. We were the talk of the building!

5. Poetry or Song Lyrics

One of my favorite writing pieces from my youngest son’s preschool days was a “song” he wrote. It had preschool words, and music notes, and was written on yellow construction paper, and, when asked to sing it, he sang it the same way each time. He still likes to write songs and raps, and perform them.

Music as a writing form
Writing music, poetry and song lyrics provides a different way for students to practice powerful word choice. (c) Kim M. Bennett, 2012.

Writing forms like poetry and songs, teach important writing ideas:

  • Powerful word choice: since the author can only use a few words to convey a big idea;
  • Visualization and elaborative detail;
  • How to create a mood using the words or formation of the text;
  • The connection between art, music and words when conveying a message.

For many kids, analyzing song lyrics works when poetry study does not, because the text is relevant and familiar to them. In my high school behavioral health class, we regularly have “music group” for our life skills part of the day. Students choose a song based on an assignment (“a song that makes you think of happy times” ~ “a song for sad days”), and then explain why they chose it to the rest of the class.

6. A Narrative…

I will be the first to admit to any child, that writing fictional stories is NOT my strong suit. I am great at personal narratives, and love to spin a yarn (usually at the expense of my family), however.

Whether fictional or based on real-life events, it is important for kids to learn how to tell a story. Story-telling is an ancient art form, and serves many social and literary needs, and teaches many things:

  • How to build a plot where the action rises and falls;
  • The importance of setting, character development and elaborative detail (even in true accounts);
  • How to set a tone (humor, drama, reflection)
Fictional narratives
Whether fictional or personal, narratives teach students how to weave a good story. (c) Kim M. Bennett, 2012.

When my eldest son moved into a new apartment a couple of years ago, he found a box with things from his little boy days, including a family favorite, My Vacation Journal, written when he was five. It had “chapters” such as “Uncle Andy with Vacation Hair,” “The Vicious Frog Day,” and “One Day When I Was Fly-Fishing.” It was written in all caps, and had more exclamation points than anyone needs in one writing piece. We sat in my backyard, and loved it all over again.

7. An Argument…

So here’s a type of writing that has important life implications, whether you’re trying to convince your dad to buy you a new bike, applying for a summer job, asking a date to the prom, or completing a college application.

Here are things this type of writing teaches:

  • How to clearly state your position
  • How to back up your position with real evidence (not your opinions)
  • How to evaluate and then choose the best evidence to support your position
  • How to anticipate alternative views and prepare for them in your argument

Not that we wish to abdicate all parental decision-making, but it’s really hard to resist a well-crafted argument when your kids and students bring it to you!

8. An Informational Article…

I mean, more than that old chestnut, the animal report. If you look over your mail table or coffee table, you probably see more informational text than fictional pieces. A lot of the “heavy lifting” of the informational text genre comes before the actual writing:

  • Engaging Topic – What would I like to write about? What would people like to read about? What are people already writing about?
  • Inquiry – What would I like to/need to know about this topic? What is already written?
  • Research – What is good source material? How do I evaluate sources?
  • Format and Structure – How does the format of my piece also teach?
Writing about our African-American heritage
Writing informational pieces teaches students important research skills. (c) Kim M. Bennett, 2012.

My first full year of homeschooling my youngest son, he wanted to learn about military helicopters. We spent countless hours on You Tube, watching videos of different classes of helicopters, reading about the history of the helicopter industry right here at Sikorsky, in our home state of Connecticut, and learning about the different branches of the US military. He learned things through his research that he still treasures, today.

Recently, when we were packing for a move, he found prints of Navy helicopters that were given to him by a colleague of mine whose family is full of Navy flyers. His helicopter research sticks with him, even almost 10 years later.

9. A Photo Caption…

Last night, my youngest and I were working on a blog article I was writing on interactive bulletin boards as a center (he was providing over-the-shoulder commentary and feedback on my work), and we began talking about what to put in a caption of a photograph. A writer needs to cover a lot of territory in two sentences and an image:

  • Summarization
  • Creating “stand-alone” visuals
  • Proper use of the “snipping tool” and other photo-capture tools
  • Proper citation for images and photos
  • Non-fiction text features
  • Choice and placement of graphics, including their captions
  • Attributions and copyright laws

My son uses screen captures and the “snipping tool” all the time, but never realized that you can’t simply place someone else’s photo in your PowerPoint without properly acknowledging its creator.

Apple Experiments
Young children often like to add signs to their work — another form of caption. (c) Kim M. Bennett, 2012.

10. The Directions for Doing Something

My middle son is a lifelong LEGO-Maniac. Even as an adult, he used the excuse of having a little brother who is 14 years his junior as an opportunity to drag out his collection of LEGOs and build. All those years of following directions had a direct effect on his comprehension of procedures, however, and he has the ability to carefully explain directions to his crew at work, as a result.

Last year, one of the teens in my class was struggling to care for his hair. After a couple of the other boys razzed him for a particularly tousled day, I suggested to one of them that, instead of teasing him, why don’t they TEACH him? This teen, who, himself, has great difficulty spelling, spent time at the end of the day writing up detailed hair-care directions for the first boy. I was proud of him.

Steps to a building a lego creation
Following and writing written procedures can be practiced using construction materials, such as Legos. (c) Kim M. Bennett, 2011.

Writing step-by-step directions is a text form not seen much in most social studies and English courses, but an integral part of mathematics and the scientific method. Writing a procedure helps students:

  • Break a complex task down into important sub-tasks;
  • Think logically and hierarchically;
  • Anticipate reader confusion and address it ahead of time;
  • Learn how to efficiently incorporate diagrams or illustrations to clarify

Unlike the narrative, which tickles the right side of the brain, lists and procedures are a natural for left-brained thinkers.

Conclusion

Whether journalers, notebookers, traditional note-takers or “each class in its own pocket” teachers, the 10 Writing Pieces outlined above can be incorporated into any writing curriculum. Looking over my list of 10, I’m wondering what would happen to our writers if we focused on each one of these for an entire month. By the end of the 10 month school year, what kind of writers would we have?

I think we’d have good ones.

Posted in faith, general education, homeschool, more seeds, parents, social-emotional, special education, spirit

Living a Life of Gratitude

Ungratefulness: The Price of a Hectic Life

The world we live in can be a real doozie…

Right now, my desk is littered with planning materials for summer school and the fall, a pile of mail to sort (most of it junk), bills to pay, to-do lists, my partially completed journal for the day, a coffee cup that wants more coffee, and several cans with markers and colored pencils for my Bible journaling that never seems to get done…

It is easy to become overwhelmed with the busy-ness of life. Sometimes, the brain can be so full of things to do, worries and anxieties, appointments, and past conversations that there is no quiet, not even on the inside. The availability of information on a myriad of electronic devices only makes this worse.

Our kids feel the same pressure. And, in a paradox that hurts the hearts of people in my generation, they eschew the very things that ease the heart of a small child: sunshine, unstructured play, face-to-face time with friends, family outings.

It is not surprising that, in all that busy-ness, people of all ages become bitter and negative about things. We miss the good things that we have, because we are so focused on what we need to do and what we don’t have.

Building Gratitude

Fortunately, it is never too late to teach ourselves and our kids how to be grateful. Building gratitude starts with small steps, just like learning to read. These small steps cause us to pause in a hectic life, and consider the goodness that we already have. By simply changing the way we think about events, we can learn to be content in all things, as the Apostle Paul taught us.

Ten Ways to Practice Gratitude

Learning to be grateful is a process. Here are ten simple things anyone can do to begin a lifetime practice of gratitude.

  1. Say “thank you,” and say it often. Saying “thank you” isn’t just good manners. It lets the other person know that you appreciate him and what he’s done for you. My husband and children always says thank you to me after a meal, and we always say thank you to my husband when he cooks – we give thanks to God, and then honor the cook! Thank the postal carrier, thank the cashier at Stop and Shop… just say, “Thank you!”
  2. Recognize “stinking thinking” – and eliminate it. I once worked with an excellent teacher at a correctional facility.She had a poster in the front of the room entitled, “Accountable Speech.” On one side, she wrote negative self-statements her students made: “I’m so stupid” – “We’ll never get jobs” – “I can’t do that” – “That’s just how it is.” Next to each statement, she re-wrote it with a positive mindset: “I don’t understand that – can you explain it to me?” – “I need help finding a good job” – “I can’t do that YET” – “That’s how it was – but things can change.” Re-think the words you speak over yourself. Build yourself up with your own words.
  3. Share 3 good things that happen to you each day. When my kids were little, it was like pulling teeth to find out how their days were. So, during our afterschool snack, I asked them to tell me three good things and one not-so-good thing. This helped them focus on the good (even if it was “Jacob’s mom brought in cupcakes for his birthday”) and still honors thThee bumps in the road – in a balanced way. Try it with your kids.
  4. Make a “100 list.” I had a class once that included quite a few teens with depression and anxiety. I started this task when one of them was going through a rough patch. They grew to like it so much that they asked to be able to do it on days that weren’t going so well for the class – instead of the scheduled task. Simply start a list of things that you are thankful for. The idea is that the first 25 are rather concrete and often materialistic (new jewelry, a vacation, payday…). As you get to 75 and above, however, you get to the real things to be thankful for: still being alive, being clean and sober, being reunited with family…
  5. Start a gratitude journal. It can be devoting one day a week (maybe Sunday) to a gratitude entry in the journal or planner you already use. Or you can challenge yourself, for 30 days, to write down one thing you’re grateful for, each day. Just write it down!
  6. Complete a Gratitude Challenge. There are so many 30-day challenges online these days. Pick one and dedicate yourself to it for a month. If you’re really dedicated and committed, try working through Simple Abundance: A Daybook of Comfort and Joy for an entire year.
  7. Think of the upside of things. My pastor used to say, “Don’t complain about the light bill. Thank God you have electricity. Some don’t.” For almost any trouble you have, you can take the “glass half full” viewpoint. When you catch yourself (or your kids) looking at a half-empty glass, rephrase the statement.
  8. Give up something you love for a week. A friend of mine used to have her kids each pick out 2-3 toys to keep in their rooms. The rest would be lovingly packed and put in the attic. Every month or so, they’d “shop” in the attic, swapping out their toys for ones they stored. They grew to better appreciate the ones they kept in their rooms, as well as the ones in storage. Try doing without something for a time – you’ll be more grateful for it when you return to it!
  9. Start and end your day with gratitude. My journal has space for me to write down 3 things that I am grateful for upon awaking, and 3 things I am grateful for before retiring for the evening. I made a word cloud of June’s entries – the bigger the word, the more times I mentioned it. This was a good reminder for me about what really matters.
  10. Read one prayer of thanksgiving from the Bible, each day. King David wrote many songs of thanksgiving in the book of Psalms. If you’re not sure what a prayer of thanksgiving is, All About Prayer has a good article to read.
http://allkidscanlearn.school.blog
gratitude word cloud
My June gratitude word cloud… The bigger the word, the more times I mentioned it in the month.

Find Peace in Gratitude

As a parting thought, I want to share with you a gospel song that gets me in the tear ducts and heart every time I sing it. Blessings to you, and God bless your journey toward a life of gratitude.